Hearing Examiner

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The fundamental objective of having a hearing examiner is to have a professionally-trained impartial individual make objective decisions or recommendations that are supported by an adequate record that are free from political influences. City of Shoreline Ordinance No. 38 allows the Hearing Examiner to establish rules of procedures for conducting public hearings. The examiner presides over certain land use public hearings and administrative appeal hearings, administers the oath of affirmation, receives testimony and evidence, and after closing the hearing makes a written decision or recommendation.

Public Hearing

A Public Hearing is held prior to a decision being made on quasi-judicial applications in order to gather information and create a record upon which a decision can be based. A presentation will be made by City staff and the applicant, and the public is invited to testify. Depending on the type of proceeding, and after the close of the hearing, the examiner will either make a decision or make a recommendation to the City Council.

Appeal Hearing

An Appeal Hearing is held after City staff has made a decision on a specific request. The hearing provides the applicant or other interested parties an opportunity to challenge the decision. The City, the appellant, and the applicant (if different from the appellant) are identified as parties. The hearing is opened to the public; however participation is generally limited to witnesses called by the parties. The examiner’s decision on an appeal is the final City action, but may be appealed to Superior Court as provided by RCW 36.70C.

Public Hearing Participation

All hearings are open for the public to attend. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing if you are unable to attend, or you do not wish to provide public comments at the hearing. Please note hearings are recorded and all persons providing verbal comment during a public hearing will become parties of record to the decision. Complex information, including such items as maps, photographs, charts, or detailed or lengthy written testimony, should be put in writing with copies provided to the Hearing Examiner for insertion into the record.

Hearing Examiner Decisions