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Coyotes in Shoreline

Post Date:02/21/2018 1:12 pm

Shoreline boasts over 380 acres of park land for residents. Green spaces provide more than recreation and outdoor experiences, they also provide important wildlife habitat. Raccoons, opossums, squirrels, rabbits, beavers, mountain beavers, and turtles all make their homes in Shoreline. Increasingly, we can also include coyotes on that list. 

Coyotes play an important role in our environment and, for the most part, Shoreline residents and coyotes can coexist peacefully. However, to ensure the safety of you, your children, and your pets, it is important to keep a few things in mind. 

While curious by nature, coyotes are timid animals and will generally run away if challenged. If you come across a coyote, immediately pick up small children or small pets and act aggressively toward the coyote. Wave your arms, throw stones, and shout at the coyote. If necessary, make yourself look larger. Do not turn and run. If a coyote does not scare easily, it most likely has become accustomed to humans through food. People have either fed the coyote or left easily accessible food sources around their homes. 

If a coyote continues to act aggressively or in an unusual way, contact the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at (877) 933-9847. In an emergency, dial 911.

The best strategy to prevent conflicts with coyotes is to avoid attracting them:

  • Don’t leave small children unattended where coyotes are frequently seen or heard.
  • Keep dogs and cats indoors, especially from dusk to dawn.
  • Never feed coyotes.
  • Don’t give coyotes access to garbage or compost.
  • Feed dogs and cats indoors.
  • Don’t feed feral cats.
  • Prevent buildup of feeder food under bird feeders.
  • Enclose poultry and other small animals that live outdoors in a secure outdoor pen and house.
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